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2000 Curriculum Document

Page history last edited by Pam Burke 10 years, 2 months ago

VSLA_curriculum_doc.doc

 

Please make no edits to this page. This is here for historical purposes as we look at revising this document in the school year of 2009/10. 

 

Elements of a Library-Media Curriculum 10/2000

 

Purpose:

 

In a standards-based learning environment, the curriculum of the library-media center is focused on helping students meet standards. Since many librarians are being asked to develop such curricula in their schools, a team of librarians and I began meeting to draft a document that could serve as a framework for local work. This document is the result. Obviously, this is not an actual curriculum. What this attempts to do, however, is provide a model within which you can place your work, focus your work, and see how the work you do can help students achieve Vermont Standards.

 

We have separated the standards-based work of the library into two areas: supporting the reading program of the school and ensuring that students and staff are information literate. Within the grade ranges of K-4, 5-8 and 9-12, these two categories are fleshed out with program elements. No librarian does all of these at the same time; the hope here is that you will find links for the work you do.

 

Please remember that these are examples only; they are not meant to be all-inclusive. Use the "notes" column to fill in your own ideas.

 

Reading the columns:

 

Column 1, "Elements of Program," lists most of the familiar elements of the actual curriculum work and programs of school librarians. This column is intended to reflect the work you do now.

 

Column 2, "Standards," identifies a range of standards that might be addressed by the work in Column 1. The standards chosen are not exclusive; they are chosen as suggestions and models. PLEASE NOTE that the Field of Knowledge standards are included only skeletally, since the standards addressed would depend greatly on the nature of the projects and collaborations undertaken in each category. All references are to Vermont's Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities, including revisions from 5/99. When this document becomes web-based, there will be links to the standards in each column. For now, they are only referenced.

 

Column 3, "Key skills, concepts and evidence," identifies concepts and skills (the beginnings of criteria for assessment) and evidence pulled from those standards and the work in Column 1.

 

Column 4, "Instruction, Collaboration," identifies possible instructional and collaborative opportunities to help students achieve the standards.

 

Column 5, "Examples of possible assessment tools," indicates, where appropriate, a range of possible assessments to serve as a catalyst for your planning. These assessments must link back to the specific criteria developed for each area.

 

Column 6, "Grade level examples," where provided, are designed to provide a range of samples of good work; they are not intended to be (necessarily) plugged into your curriculum as is. They've been chosen to represent actual work in Vermont schools as well as web-based research and models for units. In some cases, the examples point to units you've already received in my newsletters; in other cases, they point to work that is either attached or on the web. At this time, there is only one grade-level example for each major division; as time goes on we hope to add to these examples with your work. One example is given of how to change a webquest to a standards-based unit. That example is:________(to be added in fall 2000).

 

Column 7: "Notes." This is a small column for notes for your use, meant to serve as a placeholder for you to attach things you don't want to forget.

 

There is also an appendix that lists resources and is meant to be added to at the local level. (Appendix to be added in Fall 2000, in a format to be determined.)

Within each area , you are encouraged to identify the work you do and connect it to the model, expanding the examples whenever possible with full standards-based examples.

The new "Standards Into Action" tool, a result of the Vermont/IBM Reinventing Education partnership, should also be helpful in working with this document. Each school has a liaison for this initiative.

What's next? Feedback, please, and suggestions for ways to improve this! Send feedback to:

Leda Schubert

Vermont Department of Education

120 State St.

Montpelier, Vt. 05620

Team members:

Beth Curtis, Fairfield Center School

Maria Forman, Twinfield Union School

Dan Greene, U-32 High School

Susan Hessey, Guilford School

Holly Kruse, Cabot School

Melissa Malcolm, Mt. Abraham Union High School 

Merlyn Miller, Burr and Burton Academy

Diane Pawlusiak, Edmunds Middle School

Harriette Phillips-Hamblett, Lake Region Union High School

Chris Terry, Union Elementary School

Shannon Walters, Grand Isle School

Pat Williams, Hazen Union High School

Permission is given to duplicate this information for educational use, giving credit to the originators

 

Elements of a Standards-Based Library-Media Curriculum: A framework for local curricula

Grades K-4: supporting the reading program/writing and teaching information literacy

 

Elements of Program:

K-4 – Supporting the reading/writing program

Standards

(possible)

Key skills, concepts and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/ collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

Grade level

Ex.

Notes

Choosing books:

-book selection

-emergent reader advisory

-reading lists

-readers advisory

-helping teachers find appropriate materials

 

1.1

1.3

1.4

5.8

 

-strategies for choosing appropriate books

-comprehending grade-appropriate material

-reading at least 25 books per year; reading three genres, reading a variety of types, etc.

 

-creation of emergent reading centers

-developing classroom collections with teachers

-public librarian/district librarians

 

-book log

-genre charts

-observation

-checklists

-other record keeping

-self-assessments

 

 

.

Reading, writing and discussion:

-story time

-booktalks

-learning about genre

-readers advisory

-reading/disc. groups

-sustained silent reading

-reading lists

-writing about literature

1.1

1.4

1.6

1.7

1.13

1.14

1.15

5.4

5.7

5.8

5.12

-appreciating literature

-choosing appropriate books for grade level, reading ability, and interests

-understanding genre

-listening and speaking skills

-audience awareness

-developing aesthetic judgment

-forming literate community

-reflecting on reading through writing

-classroom teacher: unit work

-supplying books and resources based on instruction

-programs such as Junior Great Books, Red Clover

-public librarian/district librarians

-Vermont Center for the Book, Vermont Council on the Humanities programs

-increased circulation

-checklists for standards

-individual checklists

-observation

-conversation

-genre charts

-individual reading logs

-writing portfolio pieces

-rubrics

 

 

Reading and retelling:

-using words

-using pictures

 

 

 

1.2

1.13

1.15

5.11

5.12

5.13

-reading for meaning/comprehension

-reading at grade level

-listening and speaking well

-showing awareness of audience

-using literary terminology (plot, theme, character, etc.)

-acting as part of literate comm.

-AmericaReads, etc.

-RSVP volunteers

-classroom instruction

-book buddies

-older/younger reading pairings

-Vt. DRA (Dev. Reading Assessment)

-running records

-observation

-checklists

-rubrics

 

 

 

Elements of Program:

K-4 – Supporting the reading/writing program

Standards

(possible)

Key skills, concepts and evidence

 

Examples of possible instruction/ collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

Grade level

Ex.

Notes

Learning about book awards:

-Caldecott

-Red Clover Program

-Dorothy Canfield Fisher

-other?

 

Standards-based unit

Red Clover program

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.7

1.11

5.12

5.4

-reading grade-appropriate material

-comprehending range of text

-forming aesthetic judgment

-writing opinions clearly

-supporting judgments

-persuading others

-becoming part of literate community

-see Red Clover unit

-Mock-Caldecott program with teachers

-Red Clover program with VCB (Vt. Center for the Book)

-DCF program with teachers

-community involvement

-see RC standards-based unit for examples

-book logs/diaries

-book response journals

-presentations

-rubrics

-checklists

-observations

 

 

K-4

3-4

(Red Clover Unit)

 

Purchased programs, e.g.:

-Junior Great books

-Accelerated Reader

 

 

 

5.12

-becoming literate community

-forming aesthetic judgment

-discussion

-speaking, listening, etc. (see above)

-reading grade-appropriate text

-other librarians in district

-teachers

-community volunteers, etc.

 

 

-book response journals

-presentations

-rubrics

-checklists

-observations

 

 

 

 

 

Presentations:

-authors/illustrators

-speakers/visitors

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.13

1.14

5.7.

5.12

other

-appreciating literature

-choosing appropriate books for grade level, reading ability, and interests

-understanding genre

-listening and speaking skills

-audience awareness

-developing aesthetic judgment

-forming literate community

 

-classroom teachers: displays, reports, etc.

-public librarian

-district librarians

-DOL and DOE

 

-reading logs

-journals

-research

-book reports

-newsletter/newspaper contributions

(reviews, interviews, etc.)

-observations

-rubrics

 

 

Other?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K-4: Beginning Information Literacy

Standards (possible)

Key skills, concepts, and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

Grade

Level

Ex.

Notes

Beginning Research:

-using "Information Literacy for Vermont Students" (1996)

-using "Big Six"

-other research programs, including:

I-search, IIM

K-W-L-H

(Know, Want to Know, Learn, How to Learn More),

-helping teachers with research projects

Other?

 

1.18: research

1.19

presenta-tion

 

subject

area

standards

-forming question, locating information, evaluating, synthesizing, and presenting information.

-learning library organization

-learning skimming, scanning, notetaking, organization, outlining, etc.

-field of knowledge standards depending on topic

 

-classroom teachers: research projects

-book buddies

-public librarians

-community resources such as museums, etc.

 

-benchmarks for information literacy skills

-observation

-info literacy portfolios

-checklists

-self-assessments

-rubrics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using libraries

-using card catalogs

(electronic, paper)

-finding materials

-care and responsibility for materials

-interlibrary loan

 

 

1.3

1.4

1.18

1.19

1.21

2.2

-asking questions

-responding to media

-narrowing search

-locating information

-learning boolean terms

-requesting information

-finding appropriate materials

-selecting appropriate technology

-use reasoning strategies

-other district librarians

-state and regional librarians for Interlibrary loan

-Department of Libraries

-checklists

-benchmarks for library use

-self-assessments

-observation

 

 

 

 

 

K-4: Beginning Information Literacy

Standards (possible)

Key skills, concepts, and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

Grade

Level

Ex.

Notes

Teaching media literacy:

-keeping television logs

-discussing programs, advertising, etc.

-media production

 

 

 

5.14

1.19

-demonstrate understanding of information technology; emerging technologies

-beginning understanding of impact of media

-learning tools of media production

-parents, community members

--local media resources (cable, papers, radio, etc.)

 

-TV logs

-video diaries

-checklists

-self-assessments

 

 

Other?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't forget about the Learning Opportunities! They are extremely important.

Grades 5-8: supporting the reading/writing program and teaching information literacy

5-8: Supporting the reading/writing program

Standards (possible)

Key skills, concepts and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

Grade level

Ex.

Notes

Choosing books:

-book selection

-readers' advisory

-free voluntary reading

-reading lists

-helping teachers find appropriate materials

 

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.19

-strategies for choosing appropriate books

-comprehending grade-appropriate material

-reading at least 25 books per year; reading three genres, reading a variety of types, etc.

-locating materials in library

-classroom teacher: location skills, including alphabetizing

-DOE and DOL review sessions and lists

-public librarian

 

-book log

-observation

-checklists

-self assessments

-student input on materials selection

-other record keeping

 

 

 

Reading, writing, and discussion:

-storytime

-booktalks

-genre

-book discussion groups

-sustained silent reading

-reading partners

-writing about literature

-reading lists

 

1.1

1.4

1.6

1.7

1.13

1.14

1.15

5.4

5.7

5.8

5.12

5.13

-appreciating literature

-choosing appropriate books for grade level, reading ability, and interests

-understanding genre

-listening and speaking skills

-audience awareness

-developing aesthetic judgment

-forming literate community

-reflecting on reading through writing

-writing effectively

 

-booktalks with public librarian

-displays

-author reports

-classroom teachers

-programs from the Vermont Center for the Book, Vermont Council for the Humanities, etc.

 

 

 

-various, including:

running records

early literacy profiles

-book reports

-writing portfolios

-rubrics

-checklists

 

 

 

Presentations:

-authors/illustrators

-speakers/visitors

 

 

1.13

1.14

5.7

5.12

-appreciating literature

-choosing appropriate books for grade level, reading ability, and interests

-understanding genre

-listening and speaking skills

-audience awareness

-developing aesthetic judgment

-forming literate community

-etc.

-classroom teachers: displays, reports, etc.

-public librarian

-district librarians

-DOL and DOE

 

-reading logs

-journals

-research

-book reports

-newsletter/newspaper contributions

(reviews, interviews, etc.)

-rubrics

-self assessments

-checklists

 

 

 

5-8: Supporting the reading/writing program

Standards (possible)

Key skills, concepts and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

Grade level

Ex.

Notes

Book Awards:

-Newbery,

-YALSA

-Alex

-DCF

-Michael L. Printz

-Coretta Scott King, etc.

Standards-based unit:
DCF Award

Take from

DCF unit

1.7

1.10

1.11

1.12

1.15

5.8

etc.

-forming judgments

-becoming discriminating readers

-forming central and sub questions, etc.

-classroom teachers: unit planning

-public librarians

-national organizations

(e.g. American Library Ass.)-(DOE and DOL

-see DCF standards-based unit

-student book talks

-rubrics

-self-assessments

 

4-8

DCF stand-ards-based

unit

 

Purchased programs, e.g.:

-Junior Great books

-DCF Program

-Shelburne Museum literature-based tours

-Other?

 

 

 

-various, depending on program

 

-becoming discriminating readers

-forming aesthetic judgments

-becoming a community of readers

etc.

 

Great Books program

Shelburne Museum

DOL

DOE

 

-book discussions and reports

-audience participation

-rubrics

-checklists

-self-assessments

-observation

 

 

Other

-using picture books to teach elements of story

-online book discussions:

DCF and RC

-intellectual freedom and censorship

-bookmaking projects

-web project

Standards-based unit:

Intellectual freedom

 

 

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.6

1.7

1.18

1.19

2.1

5.13

5.22

6.10

6.11

 

--understanding artistic process (bookmaking)

-understanding and using info technology

-responding to text

-forming and defending opinions

-understanding and applying first amendment

-learning about intellectual freedom and the First Amendment

 

 

 

-Vt. Center for the Book

-DCF web sites

-ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom

-social studies instruction

-debates

 

-see standards-based unit on censorship

-student web pages assessed by checklists, rubrics, self-assessments

-student led discussions and debates, assessed by rubrics, etc.

 

 

 

 

5-8: Information Literacy

Standards

(possible)

Key skills, concepts and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/collaboration

Examples of possible assessment

tools

 

Grade level

Ex.

Notes

Research:

-using "Information Literacy for Vermont Students" (1996)

-using "Big Six"

-other research programs, including:

I-search, IIM,

K-W-L-H (Know, Want to Know, Learn, How to Learn More)

-helping teachers with research projects

Other

 

1.19

1.18

6.2 6.3

 

others depending on subject

-recognizing and defining need for information

-developing search strategy to answer questions

-conducting effective searches

-using information accurately and thoughtfully

-analyzing, synthesizing and presenting information

-using a variety of formats

-respecting copyright and

intellectual property

-evaluating information literacy process

-using correct citations

-understanding use of evidence and data

-subject area specialists

-classroom teachers: unit planning

-rubrics

-info lit assessments and benchmarks

-checklists

-self assessments

-observations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using libraries:

-teaching library use

-teaching electronic card catalog

-interlibrary loan, reserve, etc.

-other?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.18

-locating materials in library and online

-understanding organization of libraries

-using reserve and interlibrary loan tools

-regional, national library resources

-VALS (Vt. Automated Library System)

-academic libraries

-checklists

-observations

-self-assessments

-templates for successful searches

-rubrics

 

 

 

5-8: Information Literacy

Standards

(possible)

Key skills, concepts and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

 

Grade level

Ex.

Notes

 

Media literacy:

-teaching about television, print, audio, and information technology

-multi-media presentations

-use of media equipment

-web authoring

- standards-based unit evaluating Web sites:

 

 

1.19

5.14

5.15

etc. (see unit)

-becoming media literate

-developing viewing, listening skills

-understanding and using information technology

-understanding impact of media

 

-technology, art and music faculty, etc.

-Newspapers in Education

-human development faculty

-local media resources (cable, papers, radio, etc.)

 

-info tech rubrics, observation

-web assessment tools (see standards-based unit)

-TV logs

-self-assessments

Evaluating web sites

(unit)

 

 

 

Intellectual freedom:

-intellectual freedom principles

censorship standards-based unit

 

6.10

6.11

6.12

1.18

1.19

-understanding importance and significance of intellectual freedom/first amendment

-respecting others' opinions

-working cooperatively to solve conflicts

-acting as citizens in democratic society

-attorneys

-organizations such as ACLU

-district and public librarians

-ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIFR)

-guest speakers

-see censorship unit assessment examples

-discussion

 

 

5-8; unit on censor-

ship

 

 

Using information technology resources:

-using online resources

-electronic resources

-e-mail

-search engines; advanced search strategies

-Boolean operators

-ethical issues

 

 

 

 

1.18 and 1.19

 

3.11

3.12

 

 

 

-using the internet

-evaluating search engines

-narrowing, broadening searches

-finding best information

-internet use policies

-respecting copyright laws

-demonstrating ethical use of info tech.

 

 

 

-info tech faculty

-classroom teachers: unit planning

-VISMT

 

 

 

-benchmarks

-technical skills checklists: Mankato, other (see appendix)

-self-assessments

-rubrics

-observations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grades 9-12: supporting the reading/writing program and teaching information literacy

9-12:

Supporting the reading/writing program:

Standards

(possible)

Key skills, concepts, and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

 

Grade level ex.

Notes

Choosing books:

-book selection

-free voluntary reading

-readers advisory

-genre

-reading lists

-helping teachers find appropriate materials

 

1.2

1.3

1.4

5.2

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

5.8

5.12

-developing aesthetic appreciation

-becoming readers

-reading various genres

-strategies for choosing appropriate books

-comprehending grade-appropriate material

-reading at least 25 books per year; reading three genres, reading a variety of types, etc.

DOL/DOE review sessions

-classroom teachers

-public librarians

-district librarians

 

-portfolios

-booklogs

-free voluntary reading

-student-led book discussions

-student input on materials selection

-checklists

-observations

 

 

Reading, writing and discussion:

-booktalks

-sustained silent reading

-literature discussion groups

-student book reviews

-critical response

-writing about literature

-reading lists

 

 

 

1.3

1.5

1.6

1.7

2.1

5.13

5.3

5.4

5.5

5.8

5.9

5.10

etc.

 

-analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating text

-writing with purpose, voice, details, organization

-thinking critically

-responding to text

asking critical evaluation questions

-comparing, contrasting, synthesizing

-understanding themes

-developing point of view

-responding to literature as audience members

-making and defending judgments

-writing effectively

-listening and speaking skills

 

 

-classroom teachers

-Vermont Center for the Book

-Vermont Council on the Humanities

-librarian presentations

-writers in the schools (Vermont Arts Council, others)

 

 

-checklists or rubrics for booktalks,

facilitated discussions, etc.

-writing portfolios

-assessment of participation in student mock-Caldecott, mock Newbery

-student web pages (self-assessments)

-writing portfolios

 

 

 

9-12:

Supporting the reading/writing program:

 

Standards

(possible)

Key skills, concepts, and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

 

Grade level ex.

Notes

Awards:

-Michael L. Printz

-Alex Award

-Batchelder Award

-ALA Best Books for Young Adults

-Pulitzer, National Book Awards, Booker, NY Times, etc.

--Green Mountain Book Award,  GMBA

 

 

Take from DCF unit

1.7

1.10

1.11

1.12

1.15

5.8

etc.

-forming judgments

-becoming discriminating readers

-forming central and sub questions, etc.

-classroom teachers: unit planning

-public librarians

-national organizations

(e.g. American Library Association)

DOE and DOL

-student book talks

-presentations

-observations

-rubrics

-self-assessments

See DCF unit

 

 

 

Presentations:

-authors/illustrators

-speakers/visitors

1.13

1.14

5.7

5.12

-appreciating literature

-understanding genre

-listening and speaking skills

-audience awareness

-developing aesthetic judgment

-forming literate community

-etc.

-classroom teachers: displays, reports, etc.

-public librarian

-district librarians

-DOL and DOE

 

-reading logs

-journals

-research

-book reports

-newsletter/newspaper contributions

(reviews, interviews, etc.)

 

 

Intellectual freedom:

-intellectual freedom principles

censorship standards-based unit

 

6.10

6.11

6.12

1.18

1.19

-understanding importance and significance of intellectual freedom/first amendment

-respecting others' opinions

-working cooperatively to solve conflicts

-acting as citizens in democratic society

-attorneys

-organizations such as ACLU

-district and public librarians

-ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIFR)

-guest speakers

-see censorship unit assessment examples

-discussion, observation

-self-assessments

 

 

5-8; unit on censor-

ship

 

 

 

 

9-12:

Information literacy:

 

Standards

(possible)

Key skills, concepts and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/ collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

Grade level

Ex.

Notes

Research:

-research papers

-multi-media projects

-I Search papers

-mini-projects

(e.g. scavenger hunts,

author lives, planning a trip, buying a car)

-web quests

-helping teachers with research projects

 

Standards-based unit:

Evaluating web pages

 

 

1.18

1.19

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.7

6.2 (revised social studies)

6.3

others depending on subject

-recognizing and defining need for information

-developing search strategy to answer questions

-conducting effective searches

-using information accurately and thoughtfully

-analyzing, synthesizing and presenting information

-evaluating information for bias, accuracy, currency, authority

-using a variety of formats

-respecting copyright and

intellectual property

-solving problems

-using correct citations

-understanding uses of evidence and data

-classroom teachers: research projects

-community members

-info tech staff

-community resources including museums, etc.

-finished projects with embedded assessments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Web page evaluation info

 

Ex:

Web quest?

 

Using libraries:

-teaching library use

-teaching electronic card catalog

-interlibrary loan, reserve, etc.

-other?

 

 

1.18

-locating materials in library and online

-understanding organization of libraries

-using reserve and interlibrary loan tools

-regional, national library resources

-VALS (Vt. Automated Library System)

-academic libraries

-checklists

-observations

-self-assessments

-written responses with rubrics, checklists, etc.

 

 

 

9-12:

Information literacy:

 

Standards

(possible)

Key skills, concepts and evidence

Examples of possible instruction/ collaboration

Examples of possible assessment tools

Grade level

Ex.

notes

 

Media literacy:

-teaching about television, print, audio, and information technology

-multi-media presentations

-use of media equipment

-web authoring

-evaluating Web sites: standards-based unit

 

 

1.19

5.14

5.15

etc. (see unit)

-becoming media literate

-developing viewing, listening skills

-understanding and using information technology

-understanding impact of media

 

-technology, art and music faculty, etc.

-Newspapers in Education

-human development faculty

-local media resources (cable, papers, radio, etc.)

 

-info tech rubrics, observation

-web assessment tools (see standards-based unit)

-TV logs

-self-assessments

Evaluating web sites

(unit)

 

 




Other?

-senior projects

 

 

 

 

1.18

1.19

New social studies

Standards

-depends on projects

 

 

-understanding organization of libraries and information systems

-varies, depending on projects

 

 

-technology faculty

-classroom teachers

-community members

- etc., as needed

 

-evaluation forms

-discussion participation

-self-assessments

-rubrics

 

 

 

Don't forget about the Learning Opportunities!

 

APPENDIX

To include: documents, unit references, web sites, web quests, bibliography of articles and books, addresses of people and organizations mentioned.

Location of standards-based units cited in document.

Biggam, Sue and Trubisz, Shayne, Pimary Literacy Profiles. Dept. of Education.

 

 

 

 

 

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